OUR VICTORIES

While HRAC provides direct service, it is important that the ‘streets’ influence the policies at the Colorado State Capitol and locally, with Denver City Council.

-2010: Clean Syringe Exchange Program Legislation (SB 189). Status: Successful

81 of the 100 state legislators voted for this best-practice intervention.  CO joined 35 states and 60 countries with legal access to syringes.

 

-2011: Changes of Denver City Ordinance for Denver SAP with City Council. Status: Successful

In 1997 and 1998, there was a local city ordinance put in place in the hopes of statewide legislation  passing at that time.  Unfortunately, it did not and in 2011 we made a few changes to the archaic ordinance with the support of the Denver City council.

 

-2012: 911 Good Samaritan Law (SB 20). Status: Successful

People who experience or report an emergency drug or alcohol overdose cannot be prosecuted for certain offenses when they report the emergency and stay at the scene until medical responders arrive in good faith to save someone’s life. People who experience or report an overdose are immune from being charged for small amounts of drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession/consumption of alcohol by someone underage.

 

-2012: Began Syringe Access, February 8, 2012.

 

-2012: Worked with City Attorney’s and Law Enforcement for HRAC participant exemption from injection device charges. Status: Successful

Folks participating in a Denver syringe access program are exempt for carrying clean or used syringes which protects law enforcement, allows folks to carry clean syringes and dispose properly of used syringes.

 

-2013: 3rd Party Naloxone Legislation with Access to Naloxone. (SB 14) Status: Successful

Not only can physicians prescribe Naloxone to opiate users, this law allows the prescription to folks around people at risk of an opiate overdose (mothers, homeless service providers, friends, etc.).

 

-2013: Statewide Participant Exemption From Possession of Syringes. (SB 208) Status: Successful

Folks participating in a Denver syringe access program are exempt for carrying clean or used syringes which protects law enforcement, allows folks to carry clean syringes and dispose properly of used syringes.

 

-2013: Passed Mobile Syringe Exchange at City Council. Status: Successful

Denver was the only city that was unable to automatically do mobile syringe exchange, due to that archaic Denver City Ordinance.  This allows us the ability to do mobile syringe access on the streets of Denver, primarily in high drug traffic area’s.

 

-2015: Standing Orders with Expansion to Naloxone.  (SB 53) Status: Successful
Senate Bill 15-053 expands access to the life-saving drug Naloxone. As a result of this law, physicians may issue standing orders for Naloxone to be dispensed by pharmacies and harm reduction organizations in the Colorado community.  Find a pharmacy here to access Naloxone in your community today.
-2015: Needle Stick Prevention Bill.  (SB 116) Status: Successful
When folks disclose syringes (either on their person/in their vehicle/or in their home) to law enforcement (especially before being patted down), they will not be charged for possession of injection device.  This is for sterile and used syringes.

-2015: Syringe Disposal implementation in high drug traffic area. Status: Successful
See success here. From October 2015-October 2016, 1500 syringes were properly disposed in this community disposal.
-2015: Supported the implementation of Naloxone upon release in 5 Metro-County jails as of April

 

2017:  Status: Successful
The statistics on overdose deaths for people recently released from jail or prison are very high. Some studies report that formerly incarcerated people are over 100 times more likely to die of a drug overdose in the first two weeks post-release than the general population.  According to the World Health Organization, two compounding processes represent the foremost factors for overdose deaths of former inmates immediately after liberation. These are decreased tolerance after a period of relative abstinence during imprisonment and the concurrent use of multiple drugs which, with every additional illicit drug consumed in combination with opioids, nearly doubles the risk of death from opioids.  As of April 2017, over 600 heroin injectors have been trained in these jails on how to recognize and respond to an overdose, and the intranasal Naloxone was put in their property for upon release.
– 2016: Protections added to 911 Good Samaritan Law from 2012. Status: Successful
People who experience or report an emergency drug or alcohol overdose cannot be arrested and prosecuted for certain offenses when they report the emergency and stay at the scene until medical responders arrive in good faith to save someone’s life.  People who experience or report an overdose are immune for small amounts of drugs, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession/consumption of alcohol by someone underage.

Setup Menus in Admin Panel